Lacrosse

Best Defensive Lacrosse Heads

September 22, 2018
Ericka

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Best Defensive Lacrosse Heads

Lining the defense is a crucial role in a game that requires defense, and lacrosse is no exception. This is why there are defensemen in lacrosse. If you are a defenseman in this sport, you may probably be wondering if your equipment is the best in the field. Before you begin to scout for the best defensive lacrosse heads, you should first know the things to consider when looking for one.

Quick Look at Our Top Picks:

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Editor's Choice

STX Lacrosse Women's Fortress 300 Complete Stick with Head
  • Head is of good quality
  • Quite durable
  • Has a nice design
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aac-table__imageWarrior Regulator Max Unstrung Lacrosse Sticks, Titanium Grey
  • Great for poke checks
  • Very durable
  • Quite stiff
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STX Lacrosse Stallion U 550 Unstrung Lacrosse Head with All Climate Performance Material
  • Well strung
  • This has a great feel
  • Has a nice channel
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Maverik Lacrosse Tank Universal Unstrung Head
  • Very stiff
  • Throws well
  • Passes accurately
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STX Lacrosse Hammer 500 Head (Unstrung)
  • Quite durable
  • Well made for its price
  • Does not warp easily
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OUR TOP RECOMMENDED Defensive Lacrosse Heads

Now that you know what qualities to look for in a defensive lacrosse head and how to string unstrung heads, you may probably be wondering what the best defensive lacrosse heads are out there. The list below determines what people deem as the note-worthy items.

STX Lacrosse Women's Fortress 300 Complete Stick with Head

This product is designed with defensive players in mind because it is very stiff. The pocket it has is unique as it has an overlapping system that allows the center runners to overlap and hug the ball, giving you more control over the ball. Furthermore, the product includes the new String Lock technology, which allows you to set your pocket to prevent your pocket from bagging. The elongated face of this product increases power which allows the defense to have the most opportunity in checks.

Pros:

  • Head is of good quality
  • Quite durable
  • Has a nice design

Cons:

  • Strings may fray
  • Head needs to be broken in

Warrior Regulator Max Unstrung Lacrosse Sticks, Titanium Grey

This product’s design reinforces the areas needed for optimum stiffness and durability. The new Tilt-tech string hold design enhances pocket tension so that ball release is quicker. The bottom rail of this product is designed for a mid to high pocket. This allows more power and hold, making it one of the most ideal lacrosse heads for defensive players.

Pros:

  • Great for poke checks
  • Very durable
  • Quite stiff

Cons:

  • Tilt-tech does not function well
  • Hard to string

STX Lacrosse Stallion U 550 Unstrung Lacrosse Head with All Climate Performance Material

This product features STX’s signature open sidewall in rear that flexes when scooping up ground balls. The C-Channel technology provides additional strength, further reinforcing the thought that the head is for defensive players. Furthermore, the dual sidewall braces provides stability on shots and ground balls, which is ideal for close D players. The bottom rail is for high pocket placement, and this product meets NCAA and NFHS standards.

Pros:

  • Well strung
  • This has a great feel
  • Has a nice channel

Cons:

  • Head has a tendency to crack
  • Flares too much at the top of the head

Maverik Lacrosse Tank Universal Unstrung Head

This product has a level 5 bottom rail. The new 4-strut design allows for maximum stability and rail support, making it a very durable head. The TRUEFORM technology allows for maximum stiffness and durability, allowing you to have the strength needed for checks. Moreover, it has a wide faced design which is ideal for intercepting passes.

Pros:

  • Very stiff
  • Throws well
  • Passes accurately

Cons:

  • Has a bit of whip
  • Needs to be flawlessly strung to hold the ball well

STX Lacrosse Hammer 500 Head (Unstrung)

This product is available in three colors and allows enhanced ground ball play with STX’s patented Speed Scoop technology. It allows the user to quickly and effortlessly scoop up ground balls while minimizing scoop drag. Furthermore, the iconic Hammer three-sidewall brace design is further enhanced to deliver more stiffness and stability to the head. The C-Channel technology of this product distributes stress and impacts the sidewall. It also reduces the chances of the head from breaking.

Pros:

  • Quite durable
  • Well made for its price
  • Does not warp easily

Cons:

  • Has a tendency to break during poke checks
  • Needs to be broken in to be more durable

Considerations in Choosing Defensive Lacrosse Heads

When it comes to buying lacrosse heads, generally you may want to buy those that are tailored for defense. However, if you do not know how to look at the specs of a certain lacrosse head, you may end up buying the wrong kind of item and may end up giving it away. Here are some things to look for when choosing a great product.

  • Strength – When choosing a lacrosse head, you will want to opt for heads that are durable. This is because you will have to face your opponents when it comes to checks.
  • Customizability – A good lacrosse head allows you to set up your pocket in any way that you choose. When it comes to defense, however, you may opt for mid to high placement.
  • Tight Stick Connection – Naturally, you will want a lacrosse head that has a good connection to your stick of choice. Having to deal with a wobbly stick will only serve to impede your performance as a player.
  • Wide Face Shape – Wide face shape profiles allow for easier and better passes than narrow ones. Thus, defensive players will want to opt for wider shaped heads. The only downside to this, however, is that the accuracy of your pass may lessen and that generally wide-faced heads make for more brittle targets.
  • Position – Close D players should opt for narrower heads with added stiffness and high pockets in order to scoop up ground balls. LSM men should look for heads with deeper pockets and those that let you throw solid checks.

How to String an Unstrung Lacrosse Head

Unstrung lacrosse heads have a special need. This will help you with becoming a better defender if you do it right. Stringing lacrosse heads do not need to be complicated. As long as you have the right tools, it is quite self-explanatory. Here are the steps you need to follow in order to string a lacrosse head correctly, especially if you are a beginner.

BEFORE STRINGING

  • Prepare the right items – You will need an unstrung lacrosse head, mesh, two long sidewall nylon strings, one middle length top nylon string, one short bottom string, one screw, a lacrosse ball, needle nose pliers, lighters, and scissors.
  • Stretch Out the Mesh – Take your mesh and stretch it out. The open side of the head should be facing away from you. If it is hard, run it under warm water before proceeding to stretch it out so that it is easier to work on.

Tying the TOP STRING

The first step in stringing a lacrosse head is to tie the top string. The process may seem daunting, but it is rather easy once you make the first knot. Here are the steps on how to tie the top string.

  • Even Out the Diamond Rows – Take the first 9 diamond rows and fold it over the other 9 diamond row so that it evens out.
  • Make a Knot with the Top String – Take the top string and make a double knot on one end about half an inch from either end. Take the string and pull it through the top hole in the sidewall and go through the first diamond in the mesh. Go back the same hole through the sidewall. Pull it back from the first diamond and pull the string through the first top hole on the scoop. Afterward, pull it through the next diamond over and make a loop. Pull it through the loop that is hanging out and pull it tightly.
  • Repeat the Process – To make the knots with the other diamonds, repeat this process to end up with four knots.
  • Secure the Knots – Repeat the first step so that you will secure the knots with a double knot once you are on the other side. Tie off the other side using a single knot. The finished product should be even all across with a diamond in the middle.
  • Cut Off the Excess – Use your scissors to cut off the excess of strings and use a lighter to burn the excess rope ends to prevent the knots from fraying.

Tying the Sidewalls
The next thing that you should do once you are done with the top string is to tie the sidewalls using sidewall strings. There are two sidewall strings that you will use here, and here are the steps on how to properly use them.

  • Create an Interlock – Take your string and put it in the next hole down from the top string from the outside in. Ensure that there is a knot on the opposite end. Skip a side hole wall, put it through the outside and bring it through the diamond. Pull it under the slack to create an interlock.
  • Repeat the Process – Repeat the process until you are halfway down the stick and stop there so you can do the next step for the pocket.
  • Do the Double Up – Take your string and put it next to the next mesh diamond, go out the top and then go back under the next mesh diamond. Then, go back out of the top. Bunch the two diamonds together to create the double up and create an interlock to keep it tight. Afterward, skip a hole and continue the same process. When you are at the bottom of the head, go through the back of the mesh and pull the string from the inside out. Repeat the process to finish the other sidewall.

Tying the POCKET

  • Break-In the Pocket – Stretch the pocket and proceed to break it in by using traditional means. Leave it overnight to stretch it out. If the pocket becomes too deep, simply adjust it using the bottom string so that it will have the right depth.
  • Finish Off the Pocket – Knot the bottom string on one end and let it go through one of the bottom holes. Pull it out through the first diamond of a 10-diamond row and weave it all the way across. Pull it through one of the other holes at the bottom of the head and tie it off with a knot.
  • Cut off the Excess – Just like before, use a pair of scissors to cut off the excess and use a lighter to burn off the ends to prevent fraying.

Final Thoughts

The best defense from offensive players is using effective equipment and skill. The items we listed above should hopefully serve as a guide on what the best defensive lacrosse heads are like. Although sometimes, it will depend on your tastes and skills. Regardless, we still think they should be worth considering.

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